IMPACT OF MATERNAL MORTALITY ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN THE SELECTED WEST AFRICAN COUNTRIES

Keywords: maternal mortality, sustainable development, cross sectional dependence, West Africa, female

Abstract

Over half a million females die every year as a result of pregnancy and birth complications. The vast majority of these fatalities can be avoided. SDG 3.1’s objective is to reduce the global maternal mortality ratio by 2030 to below 70 per 100,000 live births. Despite a number of policies put in place maternal mortality in Africa remains unacceptably high. This study investigates the impact of maternal mortality on sustainable development in 9 selected West African countries for the period from 1990 to 2015. Data used were adjusted net savings, maternal mortality, consumer price index, per-capita income and financial development. The second-generation econometric methods were employed: cross sectional dependence, slope homogeneity, Westerlund cointegration, Eberhadt and Teal AMG regression, and the Emirmahmutoglu and Kose bootstrap Granger causality test. Findings confirm the following: First, cross-sectional dependence and slope heterogeneity exist among the West African countries. Second, there is a long run relationship between maternal mortality and sustainable development. Third, maternal mortality impacted negatively and significantly on sustainable development. Fourth, the direction of causality varies across countries between maternal mortality and sustainable development. Lastly, causality runs from maternal mortality to sustainable development when analyzing the causal relationship among all countries. The findings suggest that the West African government needs to commit more funding to the health care sector and ensure access to free healthcare service to pregnant women or at low cost with quality and effective health care services if the countries must attain sustainable development by 2030.

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Published
2019-12-31
How to Cite
Afolabi Ibikunle, J. (2019). IMPACT OF MATERNAL MORTALITY ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN THE SELECTED WEST AFRICAN COUNTRIES. Acta Economica, 17(31), 51-69. https://doi.org/10.7251/ACE1931051A
Section
Original Scientific Papers

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